Plants and Animals

Dryobius sexnotatus Six-banded longhorn beetle

Key Characteristics

The six-banded longhorn beetle is a medium-sized, 0.75 to 1 inch (1.9-2.5 cm) elongated black beetle distinctly marked with 8 yellow bands: 2 on the head, 2 on the pronotum, and four on the elytra (outer wing coverings). The antennae are long and curving.

Status and Rank

US Status:
State Status: T - Threatened (legally protected)
Global Rank: GNR - Not ranked
State Rank: SH - Possibly extirpated

Occurrences

CountyNumber of OccurrencesYear Last Observed

Information is summarized from MNFI's database of rare species and community occurrences. Data may not reflect true distribution since much of the state has not been thoroughly surveyed.

Habitat

It inhabits mature hardwood forests with large, overmature trees (especially elm, maple, and beech used by wood-boring larvae). Feeding continues until after trees die and bark has fallen off.

Natural Community Types

For each species, lists of natural communities were derived from review of the nearly 6,500 element occurrences in the MNFI database, in addition to herbarium label data for some taxa. In most cases, at least one specimen record exists for each listed natural community. For certain taxa, especially poorly collected or extirpated species of prairie and savanna habitats, natural community lists were derived from inferences from collection sites and habitat preferences in immediately adjacent states (particularly Indiana and Illinois). Natural communities are not listed for those species documented only from altered or ruderal habitats in Michigan, especially for taxa that occur in a variety of habitats outside of the state.

Natural communities are not listed in order of frequency of occurrence, but are rather derived from the full set of natural communities, organized by Ecological Group. In many cases, the general habitat descriptions should provide greater clarity and direction to the surveyor. In future versions of the Rare Species Explorer, we hope to incorporate natural community fidelity ranks for each taxon.

Management Recommendations

Avoid large-scale timber harvests and retain large, overmature trees and dead snags in floodplains and mesic forests.

Active Period

Active from fourth week of April to fourth week of September

Survey Methods

Actively search trees by looking under loose bark for adults.

Search suitable habitat

Survey Period: From fourth week of April to fourth week of September

Time of Day: Morning (after sunrise)

Time of Day: Afternoon

References

Survey References

  • Borror, D.J. and R.E. White. 1970. A Field Guide to the Insects of North America and Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 404pp.
  • Martin, J.E.H. 1977. The Insects and Arachnids of Canada (Part 1): Collecting, preparing, and preserving insects, mites, and spiders. Publication 1643. Biosystematics Research Institute, Ottawa.
  • Warriner, M.D. 2002. Rare insect fact sheet for Dryobius sexnonatus (Six banded longhorned beetle). Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, Little Rock. 1pp.

Technical References

  • Warriner, M.D. 2002. Rare insect fact sheet for Dryobius sexnonatus (Six banded longhorned beetle). Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission, Little Rock. 1pp.