Galearis spectabilis
Showy orchis
Image of Galearis spectabilis

Photo by Steve Grund 

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Key Characteristics

Small orchid (10-20 cm) of rich woods; two ovate basal leaves; flower stalk short and stubby, bearing several small two-parted flowers, each with a rounded pink hood and pale lower lip.

Status and Rank

  • State Status: T
  • State Rank: S2
  • Global Rank: G5

Occurrences

County NameNumber of OccurrencesYear Last Observed
Allegan22014
Baraga11888
Barry22006
Bay11893
Berrien102012
Calhoun12006
Cass22007
Clinton41963
Eaton41962
Genesee11962
Gogebic12010
Gratiot21893
Hillsdale22004
Ingham31917
Ionia11878
Iosco12010
Kalamazoo52008
Kent21894
Leelanau11998
Lenawee31952
Macomb31919
Oakland111958
Ontonagon32005
Ottawa11894
Saginaw11893
Shiawassee11890
St. Clair21952
Tuscola11893
Van Buren11906
Washtenaw41963
Wayne61933
Distribution map for Galearis spectabilis

Updated 1/31/2017. Information is summarized from MNFI's database of rare species and community occurrences. Data may not reflect true distribution since much of the state has not been thoroughly surveyed.

Habitat

Found in rich deciduous woods, often near temporary spring ponds in sandy clay or rich loam soils, or in shady, rich microhabitats alongside common spring ephemerals. Vigorous colonies can spread into more open habitat.

Natural Community Types

Methodology

For each species, lists of natural communities were derived from review of the nearly 6,500 element occurrences in the MNFI database, in addition to herbarium label data for some taxa. In most cases, at least one specimen record exists for each listed natural community. For certain taxa, especially poorly collected or extirpated species of prairie and savanna habitats, natural community lists were derived from inferences from collection sites and habitat preferences in immediately adjacent states (particularly Indiana and Illinois). Natural communities are not listed for those species documented only from altered or ruderal habitats in Michigan, especially for taxa that occur in a variety of habitats outside of the state.

Natural communities are not listed in order of frequency of occurrence, but are rather derived from the full set of natural communities, organized by Ecological Group. In many cases, the general habitat descriptions should provide greater clarity and direction to the surveyor. In future versions of the Rare Species Explorer, we hope to incorporate natural community fidelity ranks for each taxon.

Associated Plants

Blue-beech, water leaf, sedge, bottle brush grass, large flowered trillium, spring beauty, hepatica, sugar maple, Eastern hemlock, beech, yellow birch, basswood, white pine, red oak, white cedar, white birch, ironwood, American elm, balsam fir, white baneberry, red baneberry, wild leek, wild sarsaparilla, jack-in-the-pulpit, blue cohosh, enchanter's nightshade, bunchberry, blue-bead lily, Canada mayflower, Solomon's seal, false spikenard, twisted stalk, bellwort, star flower, nodding trillium, common trillium, maiden hair fern, lady fern, rattlesnake fern, spinulose woodfern, stiff clubmoss, shining clubmoss, ground pine, striped maple, leatherwood, fly honeysuckle, and maple-leaf viburnum.

Management

This species benefits from conservation of rich forest habitat, and avoidance of excessive logging and change in hydrology. Minimize development and fragmentation. When possible, leave large tracts of unharvested forests and allow natural processes to operate unhindered. Reportedly also very susceptible to herbivory from slugs.

General Survey Guidelines

Random meander search covers areas that appear likely to have rare taxa, based on habitat and the judgement of the investigator.

Survey Methods

Page Citation

Michigan Natural Features Inventory. 2007. Rare Species Explorer (Web Application). Available online at http://mnfi.anr.msu.edu/explorer [Accessed Jul 20, 2017]

More Information

See MNFI Species Abstract

References

Survey References

Technical References

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